Peritoneal Mesothelioma

The protective tissue lining of the abdominal cavity is called the peritoneum. This lining contains a fluid which aids as a cushion by keeping the organs of the abdomen safe. When asbestos is consumed, Peritoneal Mesothelioma may develop 20-50 years after initial asbestos exposure. It is important to learn everything there is to know about asbestos and where/if you came into contact with it in years prior.

This specific type of mesothelioma accounts for approximately 1 out of every 4 (25%) mesothelioma cases.

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Causes of Peritoneal Mesothelioma

The main known cause of mesothelioma, regardless of the type, is when a person is exposed to asbestos.  

With peritoneal specifically, it can be acquired when asbestos fibers start to settle in the lining of the abdomen. Though asbestos is the main cause, the gene of the patient is a factor that shouldn’t be ignored. Researchers discovered that changes in BAP1 gene of a patient can lead to a higher risk of developings mesothelioma cancer. The BAP1 gene is responsible for controlling the growth of the cells and maintaining them to their normal size.

Out of all cases diagnoses, men are the common victims of mesothelioma.  The common understanding is because men are more in demand in working in the industrial industry.  When women acquire this type of cancer, it is usually through second hand exposure from inhaling micro asbestos fibers off of their partners contaminated work clothes. Another way women obtain mesothelioma is if asbestos was present at their place of work.

Peritoneal Mesothelioma Symptoms

Mesothelioma in general is difficult to diagnose because there are no real symptoms in the early stages. Furthermore, once symptoms do start to develop, they are often mistaken for common illnesses.  Early symptoms include coughing, muscle weakness, night sweats, fever, and fatigue. Unfortunately, early symptoms go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed until further warning signs become apparent from more serious symptoms.

It is important to see your doctor if you have or develop any of these symptoms listed below, especially if you have also been exposed to asbestos in the past.


Symptoms of Peritoneal Mesothelioma

  • Localized abdominal pain, Abdominal swelling, Nausea, Unexplained weight loss, Diarrhea or constipation, Fluid build-up in the abdomen

Advanced Stages Of Mesothelioma Symptoms

  • Bone pain, Horner’s syndrome, Hypoglycemia, Nerve problems in the arm

Mesothelioma symptoms often don’t emerge until about 20 to 50 years after initial exposure, and the symptoms do not appear until the disease has progressed into advanced stages.

Stages of Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Just to clarify, the 4 stages that specialists use to describe dealing with Pleural Mesothelioma.  Despite that fact, Doctors still use a staging method, and we strongly believe that knowing the stages and how doctors describe cancer severity will be not only useful, but beneficial for you in the long run.  This is our version of infographic models which can be used to better understand how severe your peritoneal mesothelioma may be.

Stage 1 Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Stage 1 Peritoneal Mesothelioma

The least serious stage is stage l.  No lymph node involvement, and the patient usually qualifies for extrapleural pneumonectomy.  This surgery attempts to remove the tumor and as much of its growth as possible. Highest rate of survival.

Stage 2 Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Stage 2 Peritoneal Mesothelioma

In stage ll, the tumor has become larger and it has invaded the diaphragm or the lung. Lymph nodes may now be involved. Doctors may mistake the signs of this stage of mesothelioma for other illnesses, such as the flu.  Patients at this stage have likely lost weight but still feel bloated. Surgical resection may still be possible

Stage 3 Peritoneal mesothelioma

In Stage lll, the mesothelioma has now invaded an area of the chest wall or other region such as the esophagus, chest wall or the lymph nodes. At this time surgery is usually ruled out as a beneficial treatment.  Patient usually will be suffering from sever chest pains along with discomfort throughout the body.

Stage 4 Peritoneal mesothelioma

Stage 4 Peritoneal mesothelioma

Stage lV mesothelioma has now invaded multiple areas of the body including the diaphragm, pericardium, lymph nodes and other organs. The cancer may also be present in the bloodstream, liver, or bones as well. Surgical option is no longer feasible. Chemotherapy & radiation treatments are now used to extend the life of the patient and provide symptom relief.

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Top 10 Best Mesothelioma Cancer Centers

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Traditional Peritoneal Mesothelioma Treatment Options

Surgery Options For Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Paracentesis is often performed to remove the excess ascetic fluid buildup in their abdominal cavity. Basically, it is a surgical method where a needle is inserted between the abdominal walls, membranes, and organs in the abdominal cavity to remove the excess fluid. It is also known as an Ascites or Abdominal tap and often performed therapeutic as well as diagnostic purposes.

Also known as pleuroscopy, this is a procedure where a thoracoscope is introduced through a tiny incision in the chest. Through other small incision, an endoscope is inserted to obtain internal images and videos. When surgeons perform thoracoscopy to aid another surgery, it is termed as video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery or VATS.

This is an extensive surgical procedure that exposes the patients’ lungs, heart, diaphragm, and trachea to the doctor. It is a 4 to 10-inch long incision made on any side of the chest. It helps the doctor to perform wedge resection, lobectomy, pneumonectomy, segmentectomy, extrapleural pneumonectomy and pleurectomy/decortication like major surgical treatments to manage the lung cancer.

Top Peritoneal Mesothelioma Specialists

David Sugarbaker, M.D.

Thoracic Surgery / Mesothelioma Specialist

Lung Institute at Baylor College of Medicine

One Baylor Plaza BCM MS 390, Houston, TX 77030

713-798-6376

 

Dr. David M. Jablons

UCSF Medical Center at Mount Zion

Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

1600 Divisadero Street, Fourth Floor

San Francisco, CA 94143

(415) 885-3882

Dr. Lary Robinson

Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

12902 Magnolia Drive

Tampa, FL 33612

(813) 745-8412

Charles Conway, M.D.

Peritoneal surface malignancies, complex oncologic surgeries

Ochsner Cancer Institute, New Orleans

1514 Jefferson Highway, New Orleans, LA 70121

1-866-OCHSNER

Dr. Anne Tsao

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 432

Houston, TX 77030

(713) 792-6363

Dr. David M. Jablons

UCSF Medical Center at Mount Zion

Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

1600 Divisadero Street, Fourth Floor

San Francisco, CA 94143

(415) 885-3882

Dr. Lary Robinson

Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

12902 Magnolia Drive

Tampa, FL 33612

(813) 745-8412

Charles Conway, M.D.

Peritoneal surface malignancies, complex oncologic surgeries

Ochsner Cancer Institute, New Orleans

1514 Jefferson Highway, New Orleans, LA 70121

1-866-OCHSNER

Last Modified:Apr 14, 2017 @ 12:05 am

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